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FIREARMS LAW
David Barrington Barnes
As a certificate holder, I am sure you will be well aware of Standard Condition 4(b), which applies to both shotgun and firearms certificates.

This requires you to store your firearms securely so as to prevent, so far as is reasonably practicable, access to them by an unauthorised person.

This prevents you from disclosing the whereabouts of the key to the gun cabinet to any person, such as your wife or next of kin.

Breach of this condition is a criminal offence.

(The exception would be if you and, for example, your son were

“cross-certificated”.)

It is a good idea to give your executor a sealed envelope with a letter containing information about the security cabinet and its key.

The envelope should be clearly marked “Not to be opened until after I die or become mentally incapacitated”.

A temporary permit may be granted to your executor or to one of your relatives by the chief constable (acting as the chief firearms licensing officer), which would enable the permit holder to dispose of your firearms.

He must do this in accordance with the terms of your will.

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  • Greg James

    i know this is the law but in the real world how many wives/husbands brothers/sister know were they’re closest relative keeps the key to their gun cabinet. id say about 90%