A:

Male ferrets (hobs) and females (jills) work in different styles.

Hobs tend to be methodical and almost plod through a warren, whereas jills are usually faster and will scoot along the tunnels.

Both have their advantages and disadvantages.

Jills tend to miss rabbits in their haste, while hobs are sometimes too slow to bolt rabbits, giving them time to avoid their pursuer.

I always work one hob with two or three jills and find this combination works very well.

Both hobs and jills, if bred and raised correctly (the parents selected for their good temperament, the kits handled daily from when they are four weeks or so old) will be easygoing, but beware of buying a ferret that is too feisty, as such an animal can sometimes be simply too hot for a novice ferreter to handle correctly.

In addition, try to avoid adult ferrets that are being sold as ‘perfect and great rabbiters’ – if they are so perfect, then why are they being put up for sale?