Does it make a difference?

Q: I am thinking about getting some white camo clothing for deer stalking. We seem to get a few days of snow cover each season, so I am weighing up whether it is worthwhile. Can you advise?

A: White camouflage for snowy conditions is not usually vital to deer stalkers operating outside the Scottish Highlands, but on the rare occasions there is significant low-ground snow cover, it gives the deer stalker — or indeed the wildfowler for that matter 
— a notable advantage.

white stalking clothing

A white jacket could be sufficient or decorators overalls

Animals disorientated by snowfall

Wild animals often appear disorientated when, after a fresh snowfall, their environment suddenly looks very different. I have found that wearing white camouflage in these circumstances can sometimes enable you to get much closer to deer than 
is usually possible. Alternatively, it 
may enable you to remain unseen by 
a deer that is walking towards you. It is as though the tables are turned, because in its dark grey or brown coat, the animal is, for once, much more visible than you are.

White camo clothing to consider

If you are thinking about snow camouflage for lowland UK conditions, consider a simple lightweight net jacket and trousers to go over your usual stalking kit, as it is questionable whether you will use it on sufficient days each year to make the investment in a full set of thermal white camouflage worthwhile. For preference, pick 
a pattern that contains broken grey and black rather than one that is pure white — though I have had success with a suit of decorator’s overalls. And don’t forget to wear a white hat, such as a woollen ski hat, to hide your head.

White camo for car

Realtree produce a selection of white camouflage kit – you can even deck out your vehicle if you’re inclined.

Other tips:

  • Realtree produce some useful snow camouflage kit available from Bushwear
  • You could look around military surplus stores for an ex-German army snow smock