This Renaissance-inspired recipe is a summertime treat of coarse game mousse that can be prepared in advance and kept in the fridge until ready to serve

This Renaissance-inspired recipe is a summertime treat of coarse game mousse. This can be prepared in advance and kept in the fridge until you are ready to serve. It is easy to make and delicious.

Ingredients (serves two)

  • Skinned breasts from one pheasant
  • Butter
  • A small clove of garlic
  • Salt and pepper
  • Half a glass of medium/sweet white/rosé wine (see tips)
  • Gelatine sheets
  • 125g ricotta cheese
  • Six to eight fresh chive stalks
  • Half a small melon
  • Atot of sherry (see tips)

Method:

  1. Finely dice the pheasant into pea-sized chunks (or smaller) and, on a high heat, quickly fry them in about 1⁄2oz of butter together with the chopped garlic. Season with salt and pepper as it cooks and remove from the heat to cool in the pan.
  2. Warm through the wine in a small saucepan and while it is gently simmering, add the gelatine sheets. Allow them to dissolve and stir well before removing it from the heat. Empty the pheasant into a mixing bowl, add the ricotta cheese and finely chopped chives, mix well and then add the wine-gelatine mixture. Mix this some more and pour into separate ramekin dishes. Cover with cling film and leave in the fridge for four hours or overnight.
  3. Before you are set to serve, take the melon, cut off and discard its skin and liquidise the fl esh into a paste, mixing in a tot of sherry. Take the ramekins and place them into a pan of nearly boiling water (for about 10 seconds). Carefully remove them and upturn on to a plate. Serve with the melon sauce.

Tips:

  • You can buy gelatine from most supermarkets – usually in the baking/flour section. I used three small sheets, but follow the instructions on the packet.
  • Using a Pyrex or glass ramekin is best, as you can see the solidified game coming out.
  • Use as sweet a wine as you can, and port or Madeira can be used instead of sherry.
  • Instead of pheasant, you could try using venison with sloe gin.