Latest figures show that the lapwing, often called the ?farmer?s friend?, has suffered a dramatic decline of about 50 per cent over the past 30 years. This alarming downward trend is continuing despite measures being implemented to try to reverse it.

In an effort to find out why agri-environment schemes aimed at helping lapwings appear not to be working, the GWCT has launched a landscape-scale study across 120 sites in five different counties in lowland Britain.

The GWCT?s Dr Andrew Hoodless said: ?Lapwings are adaptable birds and because they nest on wet grassland, upland moors or arable land, they should be doing quite well, but they are not. We know that the problem is not overwinter survival, but that they are simply not fledging sufficient chicks each year to maintain a stable population. Our research indicates that young chicks could either be starving to death or being predated.?

The rest of this article appears in the 26th September issue of Shooting Times.

What is YOUR opinion?

Join other ST readers in our forums to discuss your views.

Like this article? Mark this page on a social bookmarking website…

The rest of this article appears in the 4th July issue of Shooting Times.

What is YOUR opinion?

Join other ST readers in our forums to discuss your views.