Whether this season is your first time out in the field or whether you're a seasoned shooter, it's always worth brushing up on tipping etiquette

John Sugden, owner of Campbells of Beauly, and a keen Gun comments:

“The keeper’s tip is an essential part of shooting etiquette and should reflect the all-round success and enjoyment that you have had on your day’s shooting. It’s not always about the bag either, after all, if the birds are plentiful it’s the guns that are responsible for not shooting straight!”

The 12 commandments of tipping on a shoot

  1. Tipping is very much part of a shoot day
  2. It’s bad form for a Gun not to tip
  3. Tipping shouldn’t reflect the bag but rather the way the keeper ran the shoot day
  4. If as a Gun you felt welcomed, relaxed and cared for then make your appreciation known with the folding stuff 
  5. The tip should not reflect a bad peg draw
  6. The amount tipped is down to the individual (but announcing how much you’ve tipped or being ostentatious about it is vulgar)
  7. A keeper will remember who tipped and who didn’t!
  8. Don’t underestimate a gamekeeper’s influence over the host on who is invited back to shoot!
  9. Wild bird shoots command higher tips than a reared bird shoot
  10. On driven grouse days of 100-200 brace expect to tip £100
  11. For a 200 pheasant or partridge day tip £40
  12. As a rough guide, expect to tip 5% of the cost of a Gun per day

What Shooting Times says about tipping

Patrick Galbraith, editor of Shooting Times advises: “Do not feel embarrassed about tipping a meagre amount if it’s all you have – aged 16 I tipped the head keeper at Alnwick £17.00 (a tenner, a fiver, and a two pound coin) – it was all I had, having spent the rest of my pocket money on cartridges. I had to borrow some money from a friend to get the train back home but I sort of felt the keeper knew and I suspect he appreciated it much more than some wealthy businessman handing him a handful of notes.”