Longer articles about shooting, gundogs, guns, shooting advice, technical support and much, much more all from the pages of Shooting Times, Sporting Gun and Shooting Gazette

River Piddle

Afternoon naps by the water and my thoughts on them

At this time of year I travel to Hampshire for a spot of trout fishing, which invariably involves afternoon naps by the water. You might think sleeping is a criminal waste of good fishing time, but I beg to differ. (Read just how much of the day does a dog…

wading birds

Wading birds under increasing pressure from predators

I have always had an affinity with the wading birds that kept me company during the summer when I was working on the moor. I now oversee one of two sites owned by the Philip Wayre Upland Trust. The Trust land has more or less every species you will find…

In Search Of One Last Song

My study is filled with books on hunting and shooting, beasts and butterflies, flowers and fungi, but mainly books on birds. I’ve never counted, but there are hundreds of them, ranging from David Bannerman’s masterly 12-volume work, The Birds of the British Isles, to my most recent acquisition, Gary Kramer’s…

Behind the scenes at BSA

Birmingham Small Arms was established in 1861. In Great Britain. That’s an important point, because due to its close ties with its Barcelona-based sister company, Gamo, you could be forgiven for thinking BSA is as much Spanish as it is British, but in fact that’s simply not true. All BSA’s…

Royal Warrant in shop

Royal Warrants: a cartridge fit for The Queen

We were 12 miles north of Moy when the engine went bang. At first, the power started to go, then a gritty groan came from deep within the Jimny’s oily guts. I’m not mechanically minded, but it was clear we wouldn’t be going any further. Up until that point, it…

Why shooting should use the biodiversity net gain rules

The role I play in the countryside is a relatively diverse one. I am a land agent, a farmer’s son and I run a shoot. I am a conservationist, a tree planter, a fisherman and a deerstalker. I am a runner, finding great contentment padding along miles and miles of…

A pair of Prince Albert’s guns are up for auction

Before Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha arrived in Britain it would have been rare to see an Englishman shooting driven game. Prince Albert is widely credited with popularising driven pheasant, partridge and grouse in the UK, shooting his pair of 14-bore percussion muzzle-loaders while enjoying what was, at the…

Why local markets are essential to venison sales

If you’re looking for fresh food that’s steeped in local flavour, food that comes directly from the countryside around you, pay a visit to your nearest farmers’ market. Take, for instance, our local monthly market a couple of miles away in the small Suffolk town of Halesworth. It’s a place…

River Dee

A river with royal approval

The connection between the British royal family and fieldsports is long and illustrious and, happily, permeates down to this year of our monarch’s Platinum Jubilee. The royal estate at Sandringham has borne witness to many great sporting days, as has Balmoral in Aberdeenshire. Extending to 55,000 acres, and with grouse…

Best Royal Shots

Historic Royal Shots: the finest to ever wear a crown

Best Royal Shots Royalty has been at the forefront of game shooting activities in Great Britain since the mid 19th century when the Prince of Wales — later King Edward VII — promoted shooting as a socially acceptable alternative form of sport to foxhunting among the aristocracy and the landed…

Britain’s lost shoots: Hewell Estate

Those walking through the leafy streets of Barnt Green, one of the most prestigious residential areas in the West Midlands, probably have no idea that about a century ago the land over which they are travelling formed a part of the 6,000-acre Hewell Estate. Stretching from Redditch in the south…

Muntjac – everything you need to know

Among the world’s most ancient groups of deer species, muntjac walked the earth during the Miocene epoch along with mastodons and smilodons — sabre-tooth tigers — in essentially the same form as we know them today. Although they were present in Europe 15 million years ago, in more recent times…

Why all shooters should try fishing

In these days of thermal imaging and night sights, pigeon magnets and whirligigs, and when you can book a day’s shooting and confidently expect a bag of several hundreds of pheasants or partridges, it is probably more important than ever that those who shoot also go fishing. Not, I would…

mae pochard

Pochard – a diving duck that’s in decline

Similar in size to the wigeon, it is difficult to mistake the male pochard for any other duck, with his bright chestnut head, black breast, white flanks and delicately barred grey back. The female is more of a dark and rather drab grey-brown, but has a distinctive buff marking around…

walked up shooting

How we ensure shooting’s future

Nearly half a million people arrived by train, car and coach. Fishermen, falconers, ferreters, wildfowlers, game Shots, gillies and, of course, people who hunted turned out in 2002 to oppose a ban on hunting with hounds. How had this oldest of sports become indefensible to the masses? The answer is…

Britain’s best ever Shots: Reginald Rimington-Wilson

Something of an obscure figure in the annals of game shooting history, Reginald Henry Rimington-Wilson, commonly known as R H Rimington-Wilson, was regarded by his peers as the best grouse Shot on Earth prior to the outbreak of World War I. He was also considered to be the joint-second-top Shot…