The Mayor of Liverpool has taken action against the event.

The British Shooting Show Liverpool was to take place in September 2020, but has now been banned after action by the Mayor of Liverpool, Joe Anderson.

Anderson said: ‘This Council declares its complete opposition to any form of hunting live animals with hounds or shooting live game, in the UK or overseas. We note that this is barbaric in all cases, and in many cases also threatens species that are already precarious.’

BASC’s Garry Doolan commented: ““The mayor’s poorly-advised intervention appears to put him seriously at odds with his own party which only last week at its annual conference spoke of the importance and shooting to the economy and the environment.

“Labour’s shadow minister for the environment told a rural reception that countryside issues matter to Labour and the party wants to make sure the environment is top of the agenda.

“Joe Anderson perhaps should have done some due diligence before wading into this issue. As Mayor, we urgently request that Joe Anderson does his part to see that this damaging motion is retracted.”

BASC has accepted an invitation from the Mayor of Liverpool to address the full City Council and speak against an anti-shooting motion. The Council meeting will take place at Liverpool Town Hall at 5pm on Wednesday 16th October.

Exhibition Centre Liverpool statement

Explaining its decision to terminate the contract the Exhibition Centre Liverpool stated: “Following an intervention from the elected Mayor, Joe Anderson, the Board has carefully considered concerns raised regarding the Great British Shooting Show and have taken the decision not to proceed with the event.

“Although it was never the case that the abhorrent practice of ‘trophy hunting’ would be promoted, we have taken on board feedback about the theme of the event, and terminated our negotiations with the Great British Shooting Show.”

Garry Doolan continued: “There are around 5,000 lawful and legitimate firearms and shotgun owners on Merseyside who play their part in an activity that is worth around £2 billion each year to the UK economy.

“Shooting keeps people in jobs, supports fragile rural economies with trade to pubs and B&Bs and has helped create and manage the countryside as we know it. Shooting and its conservation work is involved in the management of two-thirds of the rural land in the UK.”

The Great British Shooting Show at the NEC Birmingham will take place as planned from 14-16 February 2020.