shooting rats with thermal imaging scopes

Outwitting rats with thermal imaging scopes

Brown rats are prolific and resilient opportunists. This is in no small way due to their intelligence. Rat brains are remarkably similar to humans’ in both structure and function. They learn through observation, response to stimulus and have a high-functioning memory. This means that while a few sessions of lamping,…

Pulsar Krypton XG50 thermal-imaging unit

The Pulsar Krypton XG50 thermal-imaging unit

The Krypton XG50 looks almost identical to the popular front-mounted F155 and the later F455 night-vision models, and the button layout and functions are practically the same. The Krypton, however, is purely a thermal unit, working solely on the heat source given off by your quarry. It comes supplied with…

using thermal imagers ethically 

Best practice for using thermal imagers ethically and humanely

Thermal imaging is a total game changer in terms of detecting and in some instances shooting quarry species. But in terms of best practice, a few guidelines need considering for using thermal imagers ethically. It’s critical to differentiate between a spotter and riflescope because like binoculars versus rifle/scope, you can…

using a thermal imager

How to use thermal imagers safely

Before using a thermal imager The human brain learns from birth to process a colourful, bright visual world.  Our brains subconsciously assess distance, speed, size and the many other factors we see 24 hours a day. So it is key to take the time to get naturally acquainted with the…

thermal imagers

How to use thermal imagers in different conditions

Thermal imaging in cold weather Starting with atmospheric conditions, the colder the environment is relative to animal body temperature will always reveal more. In the winter months with less sunlight, stationary objects like rocks and boundary fences accumulate less residual energy but as sensor capability improves, more natural texture in…