Would classes be best to train him, or are one-to-one lessons worth the extra cost?

I am concerned that going to an expert with my untrained dog could be intimidating. What would you advise?

GUN DOGS

Paul Rawlings

Seeking advice from experienced trainers, rather than going it alone, will certainly pay dividends.

Any good instructor will make you feel at ease, and you certainly should not be put in a position where you feel intimidated.

While there are many well-run classes, there are also those that are not so good and, therefore, it is essential to seek the best advice.

The class situation can be more daunting and distracting for some dogs — and, indeed, their owners.

I would advise that one-to-one lessons with a recognised instructor are by far the best way of learning for both dog and owner.

These more personal lessons can be tailor-made to suit you and your dog’s ability and speed of progress, and need not be any more expensive in the long run.

Kennel Club Accredited Instructors have been through a robust assessment process before gaining the letters KCAI after their names, and you can be assured that you will be receiving the best possible advice, whether in a class or in a one-to-one environment.

Visit www.thekennelclub.org.uk for a list of KCAI instructors.